Death Cap Mushrooms

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Inner South Veterinary Centre
47 Jerrabomberra Ave
Narrabundah
ACT 2604

Phone:
1800 785 330

With the recent warm and wet weather in Canberra, Death Cap mushrooms are finding ideal growing conditions.The ACT Veterinary and Medical communities brace themselves for what can be fatal poisonings!

Death Cap Mushrooms are deadly! The Act Government Health Directorate is reminding people to steer clear of the world's most deadly mushroom. All parts of the mushroom are poisonous, and eating just one mushroom is fatal.

Death Cap mushrooms often grow near established oak trees and are found when there is warm, wet weather. People should not eat any mushroom picked in the wild. Anyone who suspects that they might have eaten Death Cap mushrooms should seek urgent medical help at from the emergency department at their local hospital. Anyone who sees their dog eating or playing with a suspicious mushroom should seek veterinary advice.

If you believe you have spotted a Death Cap mushroom in a public park, contact Urban Parks in Territory and Municipal Services (TAMS) on 13 22 81 to report it. TAMS will then inspect the location, and if the mushroom is a Death Cap, it will be removed and destroyed. If it is in your own yard, the best option is to leave it be. It will die in a few days. Alternatively, you can step on it to destroy it. If your dog lives in the backyard it is best to remove and dispose of the mushrooms, remembering not to touch any part of them. Do not kick the mushroom as this spreads the spores further. Never touch the mushroom with bare skin. If you see suspicious mushrooms when out dog walking keep your dog on a leash and give the mushrooms a wide berth.

A Fact Sheet providing important information about the Death Cap mushroom is available from the ACT Health Directorate website.

Information taken from the ACT Health Directorate website.


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